2015 Shattuck Lecture: CDC’s Dr. Tom Frieden on the Current and Future States of Public Health

Describing public health as the means that will “account for most of our health progress in the years to come,” Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control Dr. Tom Frieden spoke of the achievements and challenges in public health in delivering the 2015 Shattuck Lecture at the Massachusetts Medical Society’s annual meeting on Friday, May 1.

In a talk that was both entertaining and instructive and supported with statistical data, Dr. Frieden touched on a myriad of subjects, including antibiotic resistance, the opioid epidemic, the state of HIV care, tuberculosis, the impact of vaccines, the threats and improvements in cardiovascular care and hypertension, the continuing and new dangers of tobacco and nicotine delivery systems such as e-cigarettes, and the public health actions of a responsive government.

Among the highlights from his address:

On infection and the spread of drug-resistant bacteria: “The obsession to increase the population impact of our efforts is routinely complicated by infection, which could eventually undermine much of modern medicine. Our Antibiotic Resistance Initiative could reduce many infections over the next five years.”

On clinical care working with public health: “The intersection of clinical health care and public health is one of the essential concepts that underlie public health, and all too often they are going in different directions. There’s a lot we can learn from each other.”

On the Ebola crisis: “We learned two big lessons from the Ebola crisis. Every country needs to have a core public health capacity and the world has to move faster with outbreaks and epidemics.”

On the role of government: “The appropriate role of government is getting people to make healthy choices, with free and open information, by protecting individuals from harm caused by others, and by taking societal action to protect and promote health. These are the public health actions of a responsive government.”

On the responsibilities of individuals, providers, and government: “Until we have a collective responsibility for health-inducing environments, we will continue to have challenges.”

On the main goal of the CDC: “The goal of the CDC is a safer U.S and a safer world, to prevent avoidable catastrophes, to detect threats early, and to respond rapidly and effectively.”

Slides from Dr. Frieden’s presentation are available here.

A video of the full talk is available here:

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