Mass. Health Care Costs: Evidence, Testimony, and Scrutiny

“We’re not interested in just saving money, we’re also concerned aboutMassachusetts State House quality and access, but we need to do it in a way that we have the capacity to afford it,” said Stuart Altman, chairman of the Massachusetts Health Policy Commission, as he opened two days of hearings on health care cost trends in Massachusetts at Suffolk University Law School this morning.

Billed as an “opportunity to present evidence and testimony to hold the entire health care system accountable,” the Annual Health Care Cost Trends Hearing represents the first review of the state’s performance under the health care costs growth benchmark established in Chapter 224 in 2012. Over two days, the Commission is examining cost trends for public and commercial payers as well as hospitals and other providers.

Along with health care policy experts making detailed presentations, nearly 30 individuals – a list that reads like a “Who’s Who” of Massachusetts health care – are providing testimony on such topics as meeting the health care cost benchmark, transforming the payment system, coordinating behavioral health and post-acute care, and insurance market trends and provider market trends in promoting value-based health care.

The mood among the HPC commissioners and morning’s presenters as the session began was generally upbeat, as the Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA) last month released the first report on the Commonwealth’s performance. With the health care cost growth benchmark set at 3.6 percent, CHIA found that total health care expenditures increased by 2.3 percent , 1.3 percent below the benchmark. Total expenditures reach $50 billion statewide.

Governor Deval Patrick, one of the first to speak and declaring that “health is a public good,” said that “by any measure, Massachusetts health care reform is a success,” at the same time cautioning that even after eight years of health reform “there’s plenty of room to innovate” and “constant refinement” will be needed. Patrick added that challenges remain, chief among them the delivery of primary care.

Jeffery Sanchez, Chair of the legislature’s Joint Committee on Public Health, the second public official to speak, was also upbeat but cautious as well. “Let us continue to show the nation we continue to be a leader,” he said, at the same time expressing concern about behavioral health, alternative payment systems, and reaching underserved populations. He noted that minorities have difficulty navigating the health care system, and that it is imperative to “make sure the health care system is accessible and effective for all.”

Morning presentations included those from David Seltz, executive director of the Health Policy Commission; Aron Boros, executive director of CHIA, and Michael E. Chernew, Ph.D., Professor in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. Other expert speakers scheduled include Alan Weil, J.D., Editor-in-Chief, Health Affairs, and Thomas Lee, M.D., Chief Medical Officer of Press Ganey Associates.

The hearing concluded at the end of the day on Tuesday. Written testimony, agency reports, and expert presentations are available on the HPC’s website at www.mass.gov/hpc. Live streaming of the hearing is also available from the website.

News coverage of hearings:

Health care stakeholders size up cost-control bid
State House News Service via Worcester Business Journal, October 7, 2014

 

 

  1. […] and many others concerned with healthcare costs in the Commonwealth. A post published in the Massachusetts Medical Society blog describes the event as “generally upbeat,” as Governor Deval Patrick touted the success of the […]