Interim Meeting Ethics Forum: Ethics in ACOs

Susan Dorr Goold, MD

Susan Dorr Goold, MD

The accountable care organization (ACO), loosely defined as a group of providers that accepts responsibility for the total care of a patient and is accountable for high quality care and the cost of care, is a rapidly growing concept whose aim is to reduce the rising costs of care and improve quality.

While the emphasis on ACOs has focused on cost and outcomes, less attention has been paid to the ethical considerations of delivering care within such a structure.  As the ACO continues to evolve, what are the ethical issues that physicians might face as they practice medicine?  Do healthcare institutions, as well as individual providers, face ethical issues as organizations? And how might ethical considerations influence payment structures?

These are some of the issues discussed at the Ethics Forum, held on the first day of the 2013 MMS Interim Meeting of the House of Delegates.

Presenting were Susan Dorr Goold, MD, professor at the University of Michigan and Chair of the American Medical Association’s Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs, and Philip F. Gaziano, MD, chairman and CEO of Accountable Care Associates, a Springfield-Mass. based healthcare management company.

In two presentations over two hours, delegates heard perspectives on the practical and ethical challenges in making a transition to an ACO, who providers are accountable to and for what within an ACO while maintaining their first loyalty to the patient, conflicts of interest that may arise, and ways to protect patient autonomy while practicing in an ACO.

Some highlights from the presenters:

Dr. Goold, in a presentation entitled Strengthening Patient-Physician Trust in Accountable Care Organization, examined the elements of personal and organizational accountability that lead to strong physician-patient relationships.  Professionals, organizations and patients all have a responsibility in strengthening trust, she said: professionals with a duty to “seek trust from patients” based on openness and honesty, patients by being truthful and to trust wisely, and organizations as “moral characters” in modern society.

Dr. Gould also outlined the challenges to trust in physicians (patient expectations, requests, and demands) and health care institutions such as hospitals and payers (safety of personal information, treatment decisions, fair and prudent use of resources). She concluded with the notion that physicians and healthcare institutions have “moral responsibilities in health care” to include advocacy, competence, fairness, and honesty, among others.

Dr. Gaziano’s Ethical Considerations in Accountable Care Organizations focused on the payment considerations with ACOs, comparing fee-for-service to global payments (payments based on Relative Value Units) to Quality Value Units, a new designation created by his firm that provides the advantages of tracking and reporting in real time, predictive value, and the tracking of quality and budgets. He also addressed physician concerns: why ACOs are different from earlier cost-saving attempts like HMOs and opportunities within the new system of ACOs such as payments and managing budgets.

The presentations of both physicians are available on the MMS website here.

 

  1. MMS says:

    I believe that the speaker’s point was that paying for something that adds value, which is not paid for today, promotes ethical health care because it is aligned with activities that produce better health care outcomes.

  2. Dee Hindryn says:

    I’m confused. What does a QVU have to do with ethics?

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